Middle Earth SBG – Ancient Ruins Painting Guide

This guide is ideally suited for painting the bases I showed you how to make in this tutorial.

I’ve used the same basing technique for both my Azog’s Legion and my White Council, but with a few subtle changes to the painting in order to give them a different character. I’ll be going through the stages for both in full but there are only a few differences between them, but you’ll notice from the picture they end up looking fairly different.

Eerie Ruins

What you will need:

  • Citadel Rhinox Hide
  • Citadel Eshin Grey
  • Citadel Dawnstone
  • Citadel Ionach Skin
  • Citadel Pallid Wych Flesh
  • Vallejo Chocolate Brown
  • Citadel Death World Forest
  • Citadel Karak Stone
  • Army Painter Steppe Grass
  • Army Painter Mountain Tufts
  • Dark Green Leaves

Begin by basecoating the base with Sotek Green, then apply a heavy drybrush of Eshin Grey

Apply a medium drybrush of Dawnstone

Apply a light drybrush of Ionach Skin

Apply an edge highlight to the tiles with Pallid Wych Flesh

Make a mix of 1 part Chocolate Brown and 5 parts water and apply over the sanded areas

Make a similar mix with Death World Forest and apply over select areas of the sand

Apply a light drybrush of Karak Stone I’ve the sand and edges of the cork

Apply a very light drybrush of Pallid Wych Flesh to the sand

Apply some of the mountain tufts to the base

Use PVA to apply the grass around the tufts and across the sandy areas

Finally use PVA glue to affix some leaves to the base. This can be a little fiddly so I would recommend some tweazers

Dark Ruins

What you will need:

  • Citadel Rhinox Hide
  • Citadel Eshin Grey
  • Citadel Dawnstone
  • Citadel Ionach Skin
  • Citadel Pallid Wych Flesh
  • Vallejo Chocolate Brown
  • Citadel Karak Stone
  • Army Painter Steppe Grass
  • Army Painter Mountain Tufts
  • Autumn Leaves
  • Alclad II ‘mud’ weathering pigment

Apply a basecoat of Rhinox Hide to the base and once dry apply a medium drybrush of Eshin Grey across the base

Apply a light drybrush of Dawnstone, focussing on the edges of the tiles

Apply a very light drybrush of Ionach Skin to the edges of the tiles

Apply an edge highlight of Pallid Wych Flesh to the tiles

Use the same Chocolate Brown mix found in the Eerie Ruins guide and apply to the sand areas and exposed cork

Apply a light drybrush of Karak Stone to the sand and exposed cork

Apply a very light Pallid Wych Flesh drybrush to the sand and exposed cork

Apply the mountain tufts to the base

Apply a light dusting of weathering powder to the top and edges

Use PVA to affix some autumn leaves to the base to finish

 

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Middle Earth SBG – Ancient Ruins Basing Tutorial

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I absolutely love going to town on the basing of my miniatures. It’s just another excuse to add some character, variety and unification to your armies. It’s all about adding that story that really brings your miniatures to life.

The most recent basing I have been doing is for my Azog’s Legion force and today I’m going to show you what you need and how to go about making them.

I’ll be doing a series of tutorials on basing, both the modelling and the painting, so look out for future articles.

What you will need:

  • Cork Roll. I use a 2.5mm thickness, like this. This is readily available from most hobby stores, so if you do have a model train store nearby pop in and take a look. Just one of these rolls will easily last you the whole army.
  • Plasticard. I have so far been using a fairly thin, 1mm, variety. This does make it a bit easier to cut and model, but doesn’t look quite as good as a thocker variety.
  • Sand. I used Fine Sand from Basecrafts.
  • Mixed cork. Used for detailing. Can be found here, or like the cork roll can be found in hhobby stores.
  • PVA
  • Super Glue
  • Clippers
  • Modelling Knife

Building the Bases

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Begin by breaking the cork roll down into smaller, circular sections. I used the base as a template and broke the cork off around the edge. Always make more than required as these can be used for extra levels and details.

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Glue one of the circles to the top of the base with superglue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Once dry this will give you your first layer.

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Due to some of the drying times involved I’ll always build a few bases at a time, usually enough for a warband.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cut the plasticard down into small rectangular and square shapes. They don’t need to be uniform as the ruins are quite, well…ruined.

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Using super glue attach each segment at a time to build up the paving on top of the cork.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Clip off the excess plasticard around the edge of the base. The aim is to keep to the circle but still retain an angular look.

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That’s the second layer done. Normally I would attach figures at this point. It can limit your ability to paint the base but does ensure the mini will be a good fit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Next up is weathering the plasticard. Using the modelling knife make scratches across the surface. The more you add the more beaten up the ruins will look.

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Also use the knife to shave down the edges and add some bigger cuts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Use super glue to add a few peices of the mixed cork across the bases.

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Use PVA to add some of the fine sand onto small areas of the bases. I focussed on any cork visible on the top, around the mixed corks and in the cracks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Once the pva was dry I added a layer to seal in the sand. This was acheived with a mix of 1 part PVA to 6 parts water. I add this to all my bases that include sand as it really secures everything and cuts down on wear and tear.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The beauty of the cork is it’s quite an easy material to cut and craft into unique features.

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A simple slice like this and both parts can be used to make a staircase.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Glued one on top of the other they add that extra dimension and retain the circle shape.

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You can utilise this to make some pretty funky and diverse ruins. Just remember to test fit your miniatures so you know they will fit and loook good.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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you will need to cut the plasticard to fit the middle step, but the bottom and top can overhang to be cut down.

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From there it’s just finishing them up just like the others by adding mixed cork, sand and a seal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And there you have it. This is how I built and will continue to build all the bases for my Azog’s Legion force. I hope you all find it usual and I would love to see some of the bases you make using it, pop me an email at deathwatchstudios@gmail.com, find me on Facebook or Instagram.

Join me soon to find out just how I painted them as well.

All of my guides will continue to be free and open for use by anyone, but if you did find this guide helpful please support me with a donation, so I can continue to make great tutorials like this one!

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Warhammer 40k – Stormraven Base

Had a break from the hobby this weekend, so the wife and I could have a long weekend to celebrate our first year of marriage :D, and much enjoyment was had by the pair of us.

With the jetbike finished I’m now onto the next job, which is the base for a Stormraven. The client is looking for something with that little bit extra, nothing too fancy, just an obliterated nid. So with that in mind I scavenged through my bits box and found a few of my old hivefleet, Irb-Nri, and felt that the Gargoyle would be the best fit for the job. Here’s what I’ve got so far:

Storm Raven Base

Storm Raven Base

Storm Raven Base

Storm Raven Base